Coronvirus Pandemic

I wanted to give you a quick update about what measures I’ve put in place to reassure you with regards to the Coronvirus Pandemic.  I know we’re all in limbo at the moment, and it’s difficult to make plans and commit resources to future events when we don’t know what’s round the corner.  And that means that artists and makers are going to be struggling to make decisions about applying for Christmas fairs.

As an artist myself, I know what it feels like to not have the kind of cashflow or indeed overall income that can stand a loss of even the smallest stall fee.  So with that in mind, I’ve decided that all stallholders will, in the event of further lockdowns this Autumn,  receive full refunds as soon as possible.  This will of course be at the expense of paying myself for work already done on the fair, but as it’s unlikely I’d get any kind of insurance to cover this kind of eventuality, it’s the only way.  Those refunds might not come immediately, and speed of refunds will depend on how far ahead we can predict a possible cancellation of the fair(in terms of venue fees being refunded etc).  If you are applying for a stall at this year’s fair please do read the Terms and Conditions carefully, and see clause 13 in particular.

It has been a difficult few weeks.  As I have been in ‘Sheilding’ measures for a month as we speak and haven’t been beyond my garden gate, my view of the world is very much through a screen and looks likely to be so for some time to come.  We don’t know exactly what the world will look like at the end of the lockdown, let alone the end of the pandemic.  But I do know that this creative community I am part of will come out of this with new vigour and perhaps with a renewed perspective on life, and I’m looking forward to seeing you all in the flesh, with maybe even some tentative hugs!  So please do apply to 2020 Design@HEART, and lets make it the best fair yet.

Stay safe, and love to everyone.

Becky Moore

 

Business as usual?

…. Well, almost!

As we get through our second week in lockdown, it seems like every day we’re hearing of another event being cancelled.  Earlier in the week it was the Potternewton Carnival.  My heart sank.  Of course it was inevitable, and of course it had to happen.    To all the organisers and crews this must have been a heartbreaking decision to have to make and it will leave a huge gap in the lives of many this year.  And it seems like each day there’s a new “oh no….” moment of disappointment.    But,  BUT… we must and will remain hopeful.  The crisis is likely to last a lot longer than we want, but it will pass.  We will be exhausted and battered, and for many of us our lives will be changed irrevokably.  But life will go on, and GOOD TIMES ARE ON THE WAY.

So, in an optomistic spirit, plans for Design@HEART 2020 are beginning.  Today applications for stalls opened.  Contingency plans are being put in place as I write, to ensure that financial risks are minimised.  Art work has been done.  Publicity materials designed.  If we’re out of this pickle by November we WILL bring you Design@HEART!

If you would like a stall please apply here, after reading our Terms and Conditions of course.

 

ferox et ferus

Lucy is bringing ferox et ferus back to Design@HEART.  Her colourful clothing and accessories for children were very popular last year.

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I started making things for my children when I struggled to find clothing that they liked on the highstreet. They wanted bright, fun clothes in colours other than just blue and pink, so I found some fabric online and taught myself to sew. What started as a hobby then became business once my children started pre-school, leaving me with a few spare hours a week.

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I only pick bright and colourful fabrics – things you wouldn’t often see on the highstreet. I also only buy fabrics which are made with organic cotton (produced without the use of harmful pesticides/chemicals and produces up to 94% less CO2 than conventional cotton growing) and all the packaging I use is either recycled or recyclable to reduce my environmental impact. I have also started making zero waste products using the offcuts from making clothes, so I now also make reusable cotton face rounds and baby wipes.

Badgers Garden

Shoppers at Design@HEART have been enjoying Badgers Garden pickles and chutneys for the last few years, and we’re happy to tell you they’re back again this year.  But did you know how they got their name?  Here’s Jo to explain:

1

We used to have a naughty dog called Badger and if ever he didn’t come when called, we knew he would be eating the best raspberries from the canes. We started to make jam from those raspberries to gift to friends and family. As time past we grew more fruit and vegetables and that’s how we started.

Badger is no longer with us but we still grow produce in his garden that we use to turn into jams and chutneys. We have a wide selection of flavours to suit most tastes and we love to experiment with new ingredients.
Our spoon full of wonder is from garden to jar.

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Saltaire Soap

 

It’s a while since we’ve had a soap making at Design@HEART and so we’re really pleased to be welcoming Fiona Smith of Saltaire Soap and her environmentally friendly, skin friendly products.

Saltaire Soap Country Living 2018

I began making soap more than ten years ago, because skin problems since childhood made it hard for me to use commercially-produced scented soap and I wanted to design products that would be suitable for me. After experimenting on myself, friends and family for eight years, Saltaire Soap was born.

Saltaire Soap gift box with soaps

My soap is skin-friendly, made of high-quality natural ingredients, and scented with my own lovely blends of essential oils. It is made completely from scratch, the traditional cold-process way, without a pre-made base. All the recipes are my own. The ingredients I use are picked for their skincare and soap-making properties and include goats’ milk, orange juice, ground oatmeal, coffee, kelp, cinnamon and sea salt, raw tussah silk, powdered clay. I also use locally-brewed beer, which would otherwise go to waste, and local honey.

My processes are as low-waste as I can manage, and my packaging is eco-friendly.

Applications are open for November 2019

You can now apply for a stall at our  Design@HEART Fair on 9th November 2019.

Apply

Please make sure you read all the blurb and answer all the questions.  We have a new application process this year, both in terms of rules and the tech.  We’ve tested the tech and it all seems to be in working order, but let us know if the form isn’t working (after you’ve checked you’ve filled in all the boxes and that your internet is on, obviously !)

Make sure you send us good quality product photographs and complete all sections of the application form as fully as you are able, for your best chance of getting a place.

We’re looking forward to receiving your applications.

Becky

Design@HEART

 

Writing Your Artist’s Statement

Our new application process requires a bit more information than previously so here’s a guide of how to write your “artist’s statement”.  It’s nothing to worry about, we promise.  Applications open on the 1st April, so if you’ve never written an artist’s statement before, you can get a head start this coming week!

Your Statement

We know most people hate writing ‘artist statements’.  Often, the ones displayed in galleries and universities make as much sense to the average viewer as if it was written in Klingon.  And if you don’t even think of yourself as an ‘artist’ how do you even start?

If your application is successful, we’ll use your statement in our publicity for the fair, so do make sure you are happy with it and it says what you want to say about your work.

An artist statement should give the viewer or customer a bit of background to your work.  It should say the sort of thing you might talk about with a customer who asks about your work at your stall. Here’s a quick guide to what we’re looking for at Design@HEART, when we ask for one.

What you should include in your statement.

  • What you do/make
  • How you do it
  • Why you do it
  • Any influences – things, people, ideas that led to you doing what you do or producing the particular work you do.
  • Any message or point you or your work is making through your products/artwork (if relevant)

What we don’t want

There’s lots of ways of writing an artist statement, depending on who your audience is.  The important thing to know is to consider your audience. If you’re applying for a Design@HEART fair, we’re not looking for highly academic explanations of what you do.  We’re NOT PhD supervisors or an academic journal! Write for your customers in language they will understand and relate to.

  • We don’t want an essay.  A short paragraph is what we need.
  • We don’t need fancy words.  If you don’t usually use them, if you don’t think your customers will understand them, don’t use them in your statement.

How to write it

  • Use short sentences and plain English.
  • Use punctuation and grammar correctly.
  • Keep it short and sweet and to the point, between 100 and 150 words long.
  • Here’s a suggested structure.  It’s not written in stone, but if you include these things, you’ve about covered it:
    • Start with introducing what you do
    • Go on to explain a little more about them
    • Describe your materials and methods
    • Explain why you do it or why you do it, generally.
    • Talk briefly about your influences.
    • Is there something you want to add (briefly and succinctly) about your ethos or message?

This is just a suggestion. It doesn’t have to follow this formula to the letter.  Read it back to yourself, does it make sense?  Get a friend to read it too.  Does it say what you want it to say?  Would you be happy to have this description of your work and your business published? If the answer is yes, then you’re good to go.

Examples

Here’s a couple of examples.  Remember they are copyrighted – you need to write your own original statement, not copy other people’s – but hopefully they will give you an idea of what we are after. The first sticks quite rigidly to the formula above, the second is a bit more freeform.  But both contain the information our customers might be interested in, in a style that is easy to read.

Example 1

I design and make handbags. My bags are all practical as well as stylish, with simple designs. I use only natural textiles and materials, all sourced locally.  I hand stitch each bag individually.

I have always had a love of simple style and clean lines.  I have combined this with my interest in traditional textile manufacture.  I hope that my bags reflect an appreciation of the history and skill that goes to producing textiles.

I’m influenced by the colours I see around me, not just in nature but also in the built environment.  I love to spot colours and textures and patterns that go together well.

I’m not a slave to fashion.  I’m more interested in style, and practical uses of the bags I make. Above all I want people to be able to carry with them what they need and keep their hands free for the important things in life.

Becky Moore – Becky Moore Handbags (©2013)

 

Example 2

I’m a Leeds-based jeweller and printmaker, working primarily in silver and copper which is etched and engraved using techniques commonly found in printmaking.

My work is inspired by the landscape, as viewed on a flat plane through the train window and aerial views, and is influenced by English landscape painters, printmakers, and surface-pattern designers, as well as my background in garden design.

I love the textures, mark-making and unpredictability of the printmaking techniques I use, which I also translate into my jewellery and metal pictures to make pieces which will never be identical. Where appropriate, I like to add colour using traditional materials – patination recipes, vitreous enamels, and sepia ink. Exploring the chemistry of these processes in itself provides inspiration which means life is never dull!

Liz Samways – Inkylinky Jewellery (©2019)

 

 

Applications for Design@HEART 2019 open on 1st April.  We look forward to receiving yours. 

New Application Process

The application process for Design@HEART has changed!  We hope for the better, and we hope no more complicated than before.  But there will be deadlines, so it will require some forward thinking!

We know that stallholders like to know well in advance what fairs they are going to be doing in November and December, so we will be opening applications in April and May, with notifications in June.

What do you need to do?

The main thing you need to do is get organised.  If you want a stall at Design@HEART you need to apply  by 31st May.  Applications open on 1st April.  You will need to pay for your stall by the end of July.

Applications will be on line as before but with a new format.  You will still need to send photographs of your work (even if you’ve sent them with previous applications).

This new system should help you plan ahead to your Christmas schedule and will ensure that we get the best selection of stallholders possible.

 

 

 

 

Happy New Year!

Image: Lindsay Thomas Ceramics.Go to Lindsay’s website for more information http://ltceramics.co.uk/

Events in 2019

Hi and Happy New Year to everyone!

Just want to give you the heads up about fairs in 2019.

Christmas Fair 2019 I’m moving the Christmas fair forward this year, to November 9th.  We always used to have the fairs in November, at the beginning of the Christmas shopping period, and it seemed to work better for both shoppers and stallholders.  It will also coincide with Headingley Farmers Market which works well for everyone.

Stallholders’ need-to-know: We’re also going to have a new application system, to give people a fairer chance of getting in and to continue to get the best quality makers.  So this year, applications will be a deadline, and stallholders will be selected all at the same time.  I know people like to know whether they’ve got in early on though so they can schedule the rest of their Christmas fairs, so we’ll open applications early in the Spring.

Craft Clearout  For the past couple of years we’ve had a Craft Clearout/Destash sale in the Spring.  Unfortunately I don’t have the capacity to run one this year, which I know will disappoint many, as it’s a great way of getting hold of some lovely crafty goodies and of clearing out your cupboards.  But I’m going to set up an online selling event in the Spring for anyone to sell their goodies.  You’d have to be prepared to post or have people collect whatever you’re selling, and their will be a few rules about what you can and can’t sell, but other than that, anyone can join in.  You will be expected to advertise it like mad to all your friends, customers and followers obviously!

So, that’s it for now.  Please keep an eye on the Facebook page and your inboxes for further news.

Becky
Design@HEART

 

 

Silver and Stone by Helen Drye

Back in April we featured Helen Drye on our blog, talking about her work and influences.  She’s popped back to give us a bit of an update about her current work. We can’t wait to see the new collections.

I started Silver and Stone Jewellery in July 2012. I did the classic, turning a hobby into a business. It has given me the opportunity to be flexible in my work pattern around family and home.

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This year though I’m coming out of my shell and talking about myself in my branding – By Helen Drye.  This feels very strange to me!  I’ve always hidden behind my Silver and Stone branding, and I’m well known for teaching jewellery making under this name.

Helen Drye2

2018 is a year for launching my own new ranges of jewellery and showing just what inspires me. The first range that I launched earlier in the year was my Woodland Collection, a range of individual pieces of jewellery inspired by Skipwith Common Nature Reserve, near York.  This is just next to my studio.  When things get a bit much, I like to go for a walk in the Common. Skipwith Common is a National Nature  Reserve, a beautiful woodland and common land, with rare breads roaming around. You can wander through the common and see deer, black sheep, and then have a pony walk in front of you! It is truly stunning, but shhhh – don’t tell anyone. You’ll see the trees in my designs, to me there is something mystical about the Common. This area has been common land for centuries, but during the Second World War it was a RAF training base. You can still see some of the remains, but the trees are reclaiming their land. It is such a contrast, and a testament to how nature reclaims its own.

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My Woodland Collection has done very well.  I love the fact that each piece is different.

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My next range will be my Contemporary Range.  A minimal unfussy silver range of jewellery.  Modern in design and very wearable for every day.  This range incorporates the jewellery that I want to wear every day, silver jewellery that doesn’t date, and will go with anything!  I will be launching this in October, so look out for it at my Christmas events.

As we run up to Christmas, I am making time for designing and making.  I have less workshops, more exhibitions and events and less teaching.  I’ll be back to the workshops in January, when I find that I have a busy time – they make ideal gifts for Christmas, something creative to do when it’s cold and dark!